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(Bob Daemmrich)

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. Travis County residents who are registered can vote at the following 178 locations:



Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Residents can find wait time estimates for each location here.

Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir has encouraged registered voters to make a voting plan and has issued reminders about logistics. For example, cell phones are not allowed at the ballot box, and there is no longer straight-ticket voting in Texas, which means voters will have to mark each race individually.

Travis County residents can look up whether they are registered to vote here, learn more about voter identification requirements in Texas here and view their personal ballot here.

As COVID cases rise across the state and country, DeBeauvoir and Austin-Travis County Interim Health Authority Dr. Mark Escott are encouraging voters to wash their hands before and after casting their ballots, wear a mask, take their temperatures at home before voting and use the provided finger cots for touch screens.

Races to watch

This election includes some major races at the local, state and federal levels, including:

President

President Donald Trump faces off against Democratic candidate Joe Biden. The last time a Democratic candidate won in Texas was in 1976, when Jimmy Carter was on the ballot.

The three most recent polls cited by the Texas Politics Project at the University of Texas at Austin predict a tie, a two-point Biden win and and a one-point Trump win.

U.S. Senate

Three-term incumbent Sen. John Cornyn is seeking his fourth term against combat veteran and self-described "badass" MJ Hegar. Cornyn was first elected to statewide office in 1990; Hegar has never held public office, but Democrats are hopeful that their candidate can win. Polls dating back to July have predicted a Cornyn victory, by a margin of two to 11 points, according to the Texas Politics Project.

U.S. House

Travis County is spliced into five congressional districts, three of which the Texas Tribune has identified as "races to watch" this November.

U.S. House District 10 incumbent Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Austin, faces Democratic candidate Mike Siegel. U.S. House District 21 incumbent Rep. Chip Roy, R-Austin, faces Democrat, and former gubernatorial candidate, Wendy Davis. And U.S. House District 25 incumbent Rep. Roger Williams, R-Austin, faces Democratic candidate Julie Oliver.

Texas Senate

Travis County is represented by four members of the state Senate, two of whom are up for reelection this November.

District 21 State Sen. Judith Zaffrini, D-Laredo, will face Republican candidate Frank Pomeroy, and District 24 State Sen. Dawn Buckingham, R-Lakeway, will face Democratic candidate Clayton Tucker.

Texas House

Travis County is represented by five members of the state House. One of those members, District 47 incumbent Rep. Vikki Goodwin, D-Austin, faces Republican challenger Justin Berry, in a race that the Tribune calls a "GOP target."

Travis County Commissioners Court

Three of the five seats that make up the Travis County Commissioners Court are up this November.

Democrat Andy Brown and Republican Michael Lovins will compete for the position of county judge in a special election after Sarah Eckhardt resigned less than two years into her second term to run for state senator. Both candidates were selected by their respective political parties rather than local voters.

The county judge serves as chief executive of the county and oversees the Commissioners Court. The office functions similarly to that of a city's mayor.

Precinct 1 Commissioner Jeffrey Travillion, a Democrat, will run against Republican candidate Solomon Arcoven.

Precinct 3 Commissioner Gerald Daugherty, the sole Republican on the court, is not running for reelection. Democrat Ann Howard will face off against Republican Becky Bray for his seat.

Austin City Council

Half of City Council's 10 seats are up for election this November. Nineteen candidates have thrown their hats in the ring.

Council seats are nonpartisan, although all current members are affiliated with the Democratic party. You can find out which district you live in here.

District 2 Council Member Delia Garza will vacate her seat to serve as Travis County attorney. Three candidates—David Chincanchan, Vanessa Fuentes and Casey Ramos—are running to replace her. You can read more about them here.

District 4 Council Member Greg Casar faces two competitors, Louis C. Herrin III and Ramesses II Setepenre. You can read more about the candidates here.

District 6 Council Member Jimmy Flannigan is running for reelection against Deedra Harrison, Mackenzie Kelly and Dr. Jennifer Musthaler. You can read more about them here.

District 7 Council Member Leslie Pool faces one opponent, Morgan Witt. You can read more about the race here.

The most crowded race is in District 10, where incumbent Alison Alter faces six other candidates: Ben Easton, Belinda Greene, Pooja Sethi, Robert Thomas, Noel Tristan and Jennifer Virden. You can read more about the field here.

Elected members will be tasked with rewriting the city's land use code, considering further cuts to the Austin Police Department's budget and, if voters approve Proposition A, implementing the $7.1 billion Project Connect transit plan.

Propositions

There are two local mobility propositions on the November ballot.

Proposition A gives voters the chance to approve a permanent 8.75-cent increase to the city's property tax rate to pay for and maintain Project Connect, a proposed $7.1 billion, 15-year overhaul of Austin's transit system. Austonia answered some major questions about this proposition, including how much it will raise property tax bills, here.

Proposition B allows voters to opt into a $460 million active mobility bond, with funding going toward sidewalks, urban trails, bikeways and Vision Zero, a campaign to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

You can read more about these propositions—including their ballot language and who supports and opposes the measures—here.

Popular

Austonia file photo. (Christa McWhirter/Austonia)

Police have arrested one of two suspects involved in a mass shooting at Austin's Sixth Street in the early morning hours on Saturday, leaving 14 people injured and two in critical condition.

The arrest was made by the Austin Police Department and the Lone Star Fugitive Task Force. One suspect is still at large.

Police started receiving 911 phone calls at 1:24 a.m about a man that fired shots into a large crowd, and responded to a chaotic scene on the 400 block of East Sixth Street. Detectives are surveying video footage captured by bystanders and cameras on the scene to identify the suspect.

The Austin Police Department has narrowed down their search to two male suspects and believes there was "some type of disturbance" between the two parties.

No deaths have been reported. Fourteen victims are receiving treatment in a hospital in stable condition with one treated in an emergency room; two are in critical condition.

According to Interim Police Chief Joseph Chacon, "almost all" of the victims are innocent bystanders but police have not ruled anyone out at this time.

Shooting on 6th Street Austin Texas 6-12-2021 (Aftermath) youtu.be


The shooting occurred on the weekend of the Republic of Texas Motorcycle Rally. With lots of people downtown, police say it was difficult to get EMS in and out of the scene. Police arrived while the scene was still an "active threat," officers "immediately began lifesaving measures" and drove six victims to the hospital in their squad cars, said Chacon, and four were transported in ambulances.

Chacon said that the incident is believed to be isolated, and they optimistic they will be successful in getting the two suspects into custody. Multiple departments, including APD, the FBI, Texas DPS and the ATF, are involved in the investigation.

Austin police are also requesting state troopers for patrol assistance in the coming days. Chacon stressed staffing issues are increasingly making responding to emergency calls "very hard."

"Overall, we remain a safe city," Chacon said. "Also keep in mind when you come downtown, you need to be safety conscious. Be vigilant of your environment and your surroundings."

Today marks the five-year anniversary of the Pulse nightclub shooting in which 49 were killed and 53 wounded in Orlando, Florida. Anyone with information on the shooting is asked to call 911 or 512-472-TIPS.

This story was updated at 2:47 p.m. to include new information and will be updated as more details are revealed.

Austin police are investigating a homicide in North Austin where a woman was shot and killed, just hours after a mass shooting in Downtown Austin hospitalized 14 people.

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