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(Pexels)

Some voters who applied to vote by mail in Travis County have received ballots with only the July 14 special state senate contest on them, not any of the primary races.


Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir said on Twitter that the problem stems from the fact that a number of applicants did not select a party when applying for a mail-in ballot, which means that the primary runoff races—the entire ballot except the race to fill former state Sen. Kirk Watson's seat—are not on the forms that were mailed out.

DeBeauvoir told the Austin American-Statesman that voting by mail is not a "voter-friendly system" in Texas.

Those voters are now being told to cast a ballot curbside or in person.

Travis County received nearly as many vote-by-mail applications for the rescheduled primary runoff as it did for the 2016 presidential election, which experts told Austonia is due to a combination of high turnout and resistance to voting in person from people who are concerned about coronavirus.

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