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(Christa McWhirter)

Austin Trump supporters rally at the Texas Capitol as protests occur nationwide.

In the wake of election results nearing certification and Georgia's runoff elections coming to an end, President Donald Trump supporters took to the State Capitol to rally in solidarity with Washington D.C. and other nationwide protests.


Hundreds of supporters gathered to protest election results, falsely asserting that the election has been "stolen" from Trump. The event on Facebook, titled "Occupy The Capitol for Trump—Austin," counted 221 people who said they would be there.

At the base of the Capitol, more than 200 people gathered clad with signs reading "stop the steal" or "hang traitors" and flags galore, and at the intersection of 11th Street and Congress Avenue.

People gathered in groups, mostly unmasked, listening to live country performers, chanting and praying.

Floridian Alicia Andrews, who is a native Texan, said she came to protest for democracy and freedom, and to bring power back to the people.

"I don't agree with the stealing of the election and the loss of freedom," Andrews said. "I think there has been a lot of things in play to take the power away from the people and turn it to the hands of the elites who see a better way. There is no voice of our people if the elections are stolen."

While protesters gathered near the Capitol building at first, Texas DPS troopers closed the grounds after people tried to storm inside, mimicking the chaos in D.C. What started as a protest outside the U.S. Capitol turned into a mob of pro-Trump supporters breaching through security barriers and through the building.

The more time went on, the more violence ensued everywhere.

In Austin, fights were frequent and occurred both between the growing presence of non-Trump supporters and between people who were originally on the same side. Some Trump supporters began to leave, saying they didn't support the violence and yelling going on by the party they originally came to support. Some people in the area said the loud chanting of "f--- ANTIFA" became too much too handle.

One protester, who left before giving his name, said he didn't agree with the yelling and said he came to the event to have open conversations, not pick fights with people who didn't agree with him.

"I'm sick of not having dialogue—speaking," he said. "I'm from Austin, so I'm conservative, yes, but I'm open to anything. I just want us to come to something besides screaming and hollering over each other."

Crowds at the Texas Capitol began diminishing at around 4 p.m.

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