Stephanie Schwartz

Ian Voelzel, Westlake Animal Hospital's medical director, demonstrates veterinary telemedicine for the author's dog, Mateo. (Stephanie Schwartz)

It all started with an idea about Carfax reports, but for horses.

Steven Carter and Price Fallin had a friend who spent a lot of money on a high-performance horse, and it turned out that before the sale, the seller had medicated the horse to hide some problems. The group thought it would be good to have health records before a horse purchase—and in 2015, they founded Horse Facts.

Keep Reading Show less
Chris Savittiere

Chris Savittiere's staff has made thousands of masks. (Chris Savittiere)

For ten years, Chris Savittiere supplied upscale restaurants and hotels in Austin and around the country with aprons, uniforms and leather goods. To start, the self-taught designer converted his Austin house into a sewing studio. A couple of years ago, he opened a shop on Austin's east side for his business, Savilino.

Then, as restaurants and hotels were hit by coronavirus concerns and regulations, the business disappeared overnight.

Keep Reading Show less
Charlie L. Harper III

Our photographer captured Austin residents around town on the day after the mayor announced he would require fabric face coverings in public. (Charlie L. Harper III)

The day after the city of Austin extended its stay-at-home order, adding that members of the public will be required to wear fabric face coverings in public places, Austin-Travis County Interim Health Authority Dr. Mark Escott said that masks will be a way of life in Austin for quite a while in response to the coronavirus epidemic.

"The requirement for facial coverings is likely to be a longstanding requirement," he said at a virtual press conference today. "Nobody expects that this thing is going to go away."

Keep Reading Show less
Charlie L. Harper III

Jon Hockenyos projects that unemployment numbers will drop again by the end of September. (Charlie L. Harper III)

Jon Hockenyos, the economic advisor who earlier this week told the Austin City Council that job losses in the Austin metro area could total over 261,000, says that most of the people losing those jobs will probably be reemployed by the end of September.

Keep Reading Show less

Michael Dell remains at the top of the list of local billionaires. (Hartmann Studios)

Forbes has released its annual list of the world's billionaires, and eight Austin-area billionaires have made the cut. The wealth used for the list reflects net worth as of March 18.

Michael Dell remains the richest man in town, with a Forbes-list net worth of $22.9 billion. His wealth is down from $32.3 in September of last year. He is ranked as the 33rd richest person in the world.

Keep Reading Show less
Texas Advanced Computing Center

The Frontera supercomputer of the Texas Advanced Computing Center at UT-Austin is ranked No. 5 fastest in the world and No. 1 for academic systems, according to the November 2019 Top500 rankings. (TACC)

Welcome to Austonia, a new, locally owned news company here to report on news, business, and politics in Austin, Texas. Like what you see? Sign up for our daily newsletter to get our latest stories in your inbox.

In early March, when experimental scientists released an important batch of information about the coronavirus, biophysicist Rommie Amaro sent an email to Dan Stanzione at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). She asked for time on Frontera, the fifth most powerful supercomputer in the world.

Keep Reading Show less
photo by Stephanie Schwartz

"It all hits you so hard and so fast," Wu Chow owner Stuart Thomajan said. (Stephanie Schwartz)

Austin's Salt Lick restaurant got its start in 1967, when Thurman Roberts and his wife Hisako chose item number 14—sell barbecue— from their list of 54 ways to possibly make a living in the small town of Driftwood. Thurman built a barbecue pit and began selling meat on weekends.
Keep Reading Show less
Scott David Gordon/Johnson's Backyard Garden

Customers wait in line for Johnson's Backyard Garden produce, social distancing from each other. (Scott David Gordon/Johnson's Backyard Garden)

About two years ago, Sam Lillie studied his neighbors' backyards on Google Maps, looking for signs that they were growing food. If he could see planting rows in the image, he would knock on the neighbor's door and ask whether they were interested in selling some of their crop.

Not long before, Lillie had attended a town hall meeting in his small Washington State community and learned that residents were having trouble obtaining local food. He figured there was a way to fix this, and he set about connecting buyers with small local growers. He says that within three months, he had delivered about 300 pounds of food on his bicycle.

He then set out to create a digital platform. Austin's MassChallenge startup accelerator accepted him, so he moved to Texas and created Vinder, an app that connects individuals who want to buy produce with local farmers in Austin and about 100 other cities.

Keep Reading Show less