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(Unagi)

There's a new scooter in town.


Unagi, an Oakland-based electric scooter company, announced it is launching a monthly subscription service in Austin, along with five other large U.S. cities, on Wednesday. The service was previously only available in New York and Los Angeles.

For $49 a month, Unagi customers will receive a stylish electric scooter—which retails for nearly $1,000—as well as maintenance and insurance coverage.

In addition to Austin, Unagi is also expanding its subscription model to Miami, Nashville, Phoenix, the San Francisco Bay Area and Seattle. The announcement was coupled with the news that Unagi has raised $10.5 million in Series A funding.

Unagi's arrival comes after the departure of a number of shared electric scooter companies—including Lyft, Spin and Revel—over the course of the pandemic.

Unlike shared scooter companies, Unagi's service operates more like a rental, with unlimited ride time and other perks.

Between Jan. 1 and Monday, the Austin transportation department has recorded 254,965 total micro-mobility trips. In comparison, over the same time period last year, there were more than double that number—634,985 trips—tallied.

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