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Finally, the winter storm's tight hold on Texas has loosened and restrictions on water and energy use have been brought back to normal.


On Wednesday morning, Travis County Judge Andy Brown lifted emergency restrictions that previously prohibited the excessive use of water and power, including car washes and exterior lighting.

The announcement comes after Austin Water announced Tuesday night that city reservoirs had reached the healthy level of more than 120 million gallons. Previously, reservoirs had dropped lower than 32 million gallons as a dayslong water outage overtook the city.

Restrictions that were lifted include prohibition on:

  • Use of water for irrigation or irrigation equipment
  • Washing vehicles at car washes or at home
  • Washing pavement or other surfaces
  • Adding water to a pool or spa
  • Conducting foundation watering
  • Operating an ornamental fountain or pond
Austin Water said that some in the southernmost and northernmost areas of Austin may experience cloudy water due to air in the lines. Throughout the day, the system will work to improve system pressure and clarity.

To ensure that freshwater is coming out of pipes, the department says that residents should run all cold water faucets for one minute.

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