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Ullrich Water Treatment plant on Wednesday. (Steven Joyner)

The sun is up in Austin, and with it comes some hope for energy and water restoration in the city.

While the boil-water notice continues and many Austinites are left either without water or without power to boil it, the city of Austin is working to bring back the water supply by this weekend and give residents as much drinking water as possible through a multi-step distribution process.


Water Update

Austin Water announced Saturday morning that the city is producing and delivering more water than it is consuming, meaning that water storage can once again begin to build up. According to the service, Austin is over halfway to a stabilized water supply, with 50.43 of the 100 million gallons in storage needed to build pressure within the water system.


Once a buildup occurs in storage, residents will begin to see their water supply come back, first with low pressure, and then finally back to normal. However, the boil-water notice will still be in effect until the city conducts sufficient sampling to ensure water is safe to drink.

Here's a map of water utility service around the city as of 8 a.m. on Saturday:


As the city continues to conserve water and build up its reservoirs, a multi-phase water distribution plan is in action to help bring safe drinking water to residents. The city received 100 million gallons of water packaged in 16-ounce bottles from surrounding states on Friday evening.

The city of Austin began its first phase in water distribution on Friday as limited supplies came in, prioritizing those in cold weather shelters or warming centers as well as COVID-19 isolation facilities, medical facilities and first responder locations.

After the most critical sites are given water, the city said it would team up with community organizations such as the Austin Disaster Relief Network and Capital Metro to bring water to vulnerable populations. Those with special needs, seniors and others with medical conditions will be prioritized as part of Phase II operations on Saturday.

Finally, Austin will be able to set up Phase III, or distribution sites for the general public, by Sunday. The city announced that it would disclose distribution site locations on Saturday, and that it hopes to have sites in all City Council districts as well as critical spots in Travis County.

As supply remains limited, the city recommends that anyone who can buy water do so instead of receiving drinking water from any distribution sites.

Power Update

At 10:30 on Saturday, Austin Energy announced that it was able to restore power to another 12,000 customers overnight, bringing total outages to 6,100.

Many of the current power outages are the result of 135 current hazards, including fallen limbs or downed power lines. Because these outages require manual repair, it could take several more days before power is totally restored throughout the city, although warming temperatures can help speed up efforts.

The service is also bringing in 25 contact crews from San Antonio to help with fuses, which are melting due to cold load pickup.

Although most outages are due to outside hazards, the service recommends anyone without power check their breaker just in case. A full outage map can be found here.

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